5.5 C
London
Thursday, December 1, 2022

1,200 new homes approved despite warnings from air quality expert – South London News

Must read

Closing arguments begin in the Trump Organization tax fraud case

Closing arguments began Thursday in the tax fraud case against the Trump Organization, which is accused of a sweeping, 15-year scheme to compensate top...

Medibank Hackers Declare ‘Case Closed’ As Hoard Of Stolen Data Is Released • londonbusinessblog.com

The cybercriminals behind the Medibank ransomware attack have published what appears to be the rest of the data stolen from the Australian health insurance...

Coinbase says Apple forced it to remove NFT transfers from its iOS wallet

Coinbase has accused Apple of forcing it to remove NFT transfers from the Wallet app on iOS. On Thursday, it tweeted that Apple...

Hour One’s $20 Million Deck • londonbusinessblog.com

Over the yearshas Mike Butcher covered Hour one a number of times here on londonbusinessblog.com. The company uses AI to create text-to-video solutions...
Shreya Christinahttps://londonbusinessblog.com
Shreya has been with londonbusinessblog.com for 3 years, writing copy for client websites, blog posts, EDMs and other mediums to engage readers and encourage action. By collaborating with clients, our SEO manager and the wider londonbusinessblog.com team, Shreya seeks to understand an audience before creating memorable, persuasive copy.

By Kiro Evans, Local Democracy Reporter

The view of the River Thames is set to change forever after 1,200 new homes in Charlton were approved last night.

The huge project by London Homebuilding Partnership and Hyde Group will see the dramatic transformation of the area of Greenwich.

The plans were approved by the Greenwich council planning board after a knife-edge vote which saw chair Stephen Brain cast the deciding ballot.

It came despite opposition from councillors and residents over the height and scale of the redevelopment and the air quality of the area due to a nearby asphalt plant.

Developers Hyde will build 718 new flats in Herringham Road and New Lyndenburg Street close to the Thames in blocks that range from four to 10 storeys high.

Other outlined proposals were approved which will see a further 494 flats added after the initial phase. Forty per cent of the homes will be affordable according to the planning papers.

A Hyde spokesperson told last night’s meeting: “Hyde’s core purpose is to deliver high-quality, safe, decent homes. Hyde are here for the long term and will continue to manage these properties for many, many years to come.

“Our objective has always been to realise Charlton Riverside’s potential as a new mixed-use community, underpinned by quality, affordable homes.”

Plots A and C will be the first to be completed under detailed plans, with E and D to follow. Plot B represents where the asphalt plant is. (Image: Greenwich council)

Air quality expert Gordon Allison advised against the plans.

He said: “In my 25 years in the industry I’ve never seen a proposal where the building will be hit by a plume from an industrial chimney stack. It’s not a sensible proposal – when the wind blows, it will hit the nearest building.

“It’s too close and the buildings are too high. It’s not that [a development] can never happen, but you shouldn’t put buildings that are taller than a chimney stack close to that chimney.”

Regarding the smell from the asphalt plant, he said: “I find it nauseating, even though I’ve worked in the industry my whole career.”

When asked by councillor John Fahy if the health and well-being of the residents will be “compromised” due to the existing plant, Mr Alison replied: “Yes, that’s my opinion.”

Greenwich planning officer Alex Smith responded: “We’ve had significant conversations with the applicant, wharf operators and environmental health colleagues.

“It’s been concluded by our environmental health team they consider the mitigation measures and robust conditions will ensure the protection of the residential properties.”

Councillor Nigel Fletcher raised concerns about the density and height of the project. He said: “There is a reason why we don’t want to see the same levels of density and height in this part of the borough as there are in the peninsula and in Woolwich.

“There is a very clear vision not just for this site but also for the way it interacts with the rest of the borough. There is a clump of tall buildings in Woolwich and  the peninsula. This is the intermediate part between it.

“Once you lose that, the whole idea of there being a difference between the peninsula and Woolwich goes.”

Local residents groups, including Charlton Society and Charlton Together, raised concerns and the noise and size of the project.

Pictured top: CGI impression of how the new redevelopment could look once completed (image: Greenwich council)

More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest article

Closing arguments begin in the Trump Organization tax fraud case

Closing arguments began Thursday in the tax fraud case against the Trump Organization, which is accused of a sweeping, 15-year scheme to compensate top...

Medibank Hackers Declare ‘Case Closed’ As Hoard Of Stolen Data Is Released • londonbusinessblog.com

The cybercriminals behind the Medibank ransomware attack have published what appears to be the rest of the data stolen from the Australian health insurance...

Coinbase says Apple forced it to remove NFT transfers from its iOS wallet

Coinbase has accused Apple of forcing it to remove NFT transfers from the Wallet app on iOS. On Thursday, it tweeted that Apple...

Hour One’s $20 Million Deck • londonbusinessblog.com

Over the yearshas Mike Butcher covered Hour one a number of times here on londonbusinessblog.com. The company uses AI to create text-to-video solutions...

How taking solo retreats is beneficial for founders and entrepreneurs

Opinions expressed by londonbusinessblog.com contributors are their own. A while ago I flew from Minneapolis to Panama City and then took a water taxi to...