-1.5 C
London
Thursday, December 8, 2022

Floods in St. Louis: More rain expected Wednesday after record-breaking rainfall that turned roads into rivers and forced residents from their homes barefoot

Must read

Cement makers are planning to increase the price by ₹10-15 per bag

The price of cement is hardening across the country and rates have increased by ₹16/per bag since August this year, said Emkay Global Financial...

Attack on North Carolina substation creates security threats for the US power grid

The recent attack on two North Carolina substations, which power thousands of people, has raised concerns about safety standards for the nation's power grid...

A women’s care brand begins to take shape • londonbusinessblog.com

Until last year, healthcare funding continued to shatter previous records. But there remains at least one very large gap in the industry. ...

With Pickme, your neighbor can pick up your packages for you • londonbusinessblog.com

French startup Choose me has raised a $3.7 million (€3.5 million) funding round to build a new network of collection and delivery points for...
Shreya Christinahttps://londonbusinessblog.com
Shreya has been with londonbusinessblog.com for 3 years, writing copy for client websites, blog posts, EDMs and other mediums to engage readers and encourage action. By collaborating with clients, our SEO manager and the wider londonbusinessblog.com team, Shreya seeks to understand an audience before creating memorable, persuasive copy.

As the hours wore on, it continued to rain and flood the city and surrounding areas, forcing people to flee or wait for rescue teams to find them.

Jessica Perez was awakened by her son around 3:30 a.m. to find her basement flooded with several inches of water, she told CNN. Video made by Perez shows the basement covered in murky water, the legs of furniture soaked as Christmas decorations and other objects float around.

The water had disappeared by 9 a.m., exposing a layer of rubble and black silt, destroying everything in the basement, Perez said. “Never in my life have I experienced anything like this,” she said.

More than 20 inches of rain fell on St. Louis between midnight and 7 a.m. Tuesday, surpassing the city’s 1915 record of 6.85 inches. Although the downpour eased Tuesday afternoon, the area is expected to receive less heavy rainfall on Wednesday and Thursday, which could lead to flash flooding in areas soaked by Tuesday’s storms, the National Weather Service said.

At least one person was killed in the flooding on Tuesday. The man’s body was found in a vehicle submerged under more than 6 feet of water, city fire chief Dennis Jenkerson said. Police were called to the low-lying area by a concerned resident and found the body as the water receded, he said.

Rescue workers dispersed across the area to help stranded residents trapped in the flooding. The fire service responded to about 18 houses where people were trapped, rescuing six people and six dogs, the department said. About 15 people chose to take shelter in place.

A state of emergency was declared for the area by St. Louis County Executive Sam Page, allowing the state to request federal aid funding, Page said in a tweet. Shelters for displaced residents have been set up all over the region.
Among those offering shelter on Tuesday was a family from the University City suburb who said water from CNN affiliate KSDK flooded their home so quickly that they had to flee barefoot, leaving behind medicines, walkers and canes. But the items they will most mourn, they said, are their irreplaceable sentimental possessions, such as photos of relatives who are no longer alive.

Highways turned into rivers

The flooding homes also turned roads into gushing rivers, closing several streets as vehicles flooded to windows and trapped drivers across the city waiting for rescue workers on boats.

At one point Tuesday, all four highways into downtown St. Louis — I-70, I-64, I-55 and I-44 — were closed at least once due to flooding, KMOV reported.

A stretch of I-70 in the St. Louis area — where vehicles became trapped in the water — was closed in both directions early in the morning and motorists were asked to avoid the freeway.

A car is submerged in floodwater after St. Louis received record-breaking rainfall on Tuesday.

“You can see cars floating around there,” driver Jerome Smith said in a video he shot while stuck on I-70 for three hours.

By Tuesday afternoon, highways were largely clear and all bridges over the River des Peres were open, said Heather Taylor, St. Louis’ director of public safety. “While we hope the worst is over, we want to keep the public informed,” Taylor added.

It wasn’t just drivers who saw hour-long delays on Tuesday. Portions of the MetroLink commuter rail system in the St. Louis region have been flooded, with possible equipment damage threatening closures of more than two weeks while services are restored, the city’s transportation agency said.
Water covers much of MetroLink's Forest Park-DeBaliviere station in St. Louis Tuesday morning.

Images showed water flowing through the Forest Park-DeBaliviere Metrolink station. “It’s a river at the moment… I’ve never seen this in the four years I’ve lived here,” says Tony Nipert, who lives near the station.

The severe flooding that has drenched the region has also severely damaged electrical equipment, with thousands of power outages reported in St. Louis County. By noon, power had been restored to nearly 20,000 customers, according to the electric utility America.
Rising flood costs over the next three decades will mainly affect people of color, study shows

Precipitation so intense in the St. Louis area, according to data from the NWS, occurs on average only once every 500 years.

The climate crisis is driving massive rainfall across the globe, with temperatures rising making record-breaking downpours more likely as more moisture is stored in the atmosphere, experts say. Scientists are increasingly confident in the role that the climate crisis plays in extreme weather.

According to a report by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, large one-day precipitation dumps that used to be once every ten years (between 1850 and 1900) are expected to become more frequent.

CNN’s Amy Simonson, Amy Roberts, Sharif Paget, Sara Smart, Melissa Alonso, Jason Hanna and Caroll Alvarado contributed to this report.


More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest article

Cement makers are planning to increase the price by ₹10-15 per bag

The price of cement is hardening across the country and rates have increased by ₹16/per bag since August this year, said Emkay Global Financial...

Attack on North Carolina substation creates security threats for the US power grid

The recent attack on two North Carolina substations, which power thousands of people, has raised concerns about safety standards for the nation's power grid...

A women’s care brand begins to take shape • londonbusinessblog.com

Until last year, healthcare funding continued to shatter previous records. But there remains at least one very large gap in the industry. ...

With Pickme, your neighbor can pick up your packages for you • londonbusinessblog.com

French startup Choose me has raised a $3.7 million (€3.5 million) funding round to build a new network of collection and delivery points for...

An expert explains why the AI-powered writing skills of OpenAi’s new ChatGPT chatbot are so impressive

We have all interacted with a chatbot at some point. It's usually a little pop-up in the corner of a website, offering customer...