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Gay Marriage Bill: Where All 50 GOP Senators Are in the Bill

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It’s not yet clear how many Republicans will support the bill, but GOP and Democratic senators said on Wednesday they expect it to eventually win the 60 votes it needs.

This is what we found:

Four Republican Senatorshave so far either said they will or likely support the same-sex marriage bill passed by the House, and that includes: Rob Portman of Ohio, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska (probably), and Thom Tillis of Northern Carolina (probably).

Eight Republican Senatorshave so far indicated that they would vote “no” and be against the same-sex marriage law.

Sixteen Republican Senators, so far, are undecided or indicated no support for the bill passed by the House.

Twenty-two Republican Senators have not yet responded to CNN’s questions.

YES

  1. Susan Collins from Maine is a yes to the bill. She is one of the co-sponsors of the legislation.
  2. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska is probably a yes to the legislation. She said she’s open to hearing more about it and expressed her support for keeping same-sex marriage legal. “I’ve suggested to others that not only would I want to see Roe, Casey and Griswold codified on contraception, but I also expressed my support for same-sex marriage years ago,” she said. “So I’ll look at what the House is doing and see what that might mean here on the Senate side.”
  3. Rob Portman from Ohio is a yes to the bill. He said holding a vote on this issue is an “important message” and that it is “clear” that Republican views have changed over time. He noted that his “own personal views on this changed over time”. Portman publicly announced his support for same-sex marriage after his son came out a few years ago.
  4. Thom Tillis of North Carolina told CNN he will “probably” support a bill codifying same-sex marriage when it comes to the Senate floor.

NO

  1. Bill Cassidy from Louisiana suggested he is a no on the bill. He claimed it is a “dumb messaging account”. “It’s a pure messaging account. I mean, it’s clearly solid law now,” Cassidy said. “This is a pure messaging law from a party that has failed on substantive issues, be it inflation, crime or the border, and is now looking for cultural issues to somehow do better in November.” When asked if he would vote for it, Cassidy didn’t answer. “It’s such a stupid texting bill, I’m not going to get into that.”
  2. John Cornyn from Texas told CNN he is a no to the legislation.
  3. Ted Cruz from Texas suggested he is a no on the bill. Cruz, who publicly disagreed with the Supreme Court’s ruling to legalize same-sex marriage, said Wednesday that he doesn’t believe there is enough Republican support to pass legislation codifying marriage. “I doubt it,” he said. “If there is a vote, we’ll see where the votes are.” Asked how he would vote, Cruz evaded, saying, “I support the Constitution and make the democratic process work.”
  4. Lindsey Graham from South Carolina told CNN he is a no to this bill. He said, “I will support the Defense of Marriage Act” — which is what would repeal the bill passed by the House.
  5. Josh Hawley from Missouri is a no to the law, according to his office.
  6. Jim Inhofe from Oklahoma said he is a no on the bill. “Any attempt by Senator Schumer to pass legislation codifying same-sex marriage in the Senate would clearly be an attempt to divert from the Democrats’ failed agenda. That said, my views on marriage have not changed and I would not support codifying the same sex marriage into law,” Inhofe said in a statement to CNN.
  7. Marco Rubio from Florida told CNN he’s a no to the legislation, saying it’s a “stupid waste of time.”
  8. Roger Wicker of Mississippi told CNN he’s probably a no on the bill. “I would probably be a no,” he said, adding, “I don’t believe the Supreme Court will consider this matter.”

UNDEFINED OR DOES NOT SUPPORT FOR

  1. Richard Burr from North Carolina is undecided. He told CNN on Wednesday that he has not yet seen the bill when asked if he would vote for it.
  2. Roy Blunt from Missouri told CNN he’s not sure and wants to “look at it and see”. He also asked the question, “What do we feel obligated to do now?” if the Senate codifies same-sex marriage into federal law. He added: “I have no problem with same-sex marriage, but I’m not sure – I want to look at the legislation.”
  3. Mike Braun from Indiana told CNN on Wednesday that he will wait for the bill to be brought to the Senate floor, then he will look into it.
  4. Joni Ernst of Iowa is open to the same-sex marriage legislation, and she will review the bill if it goes before the Senate, a spokesman for her office said.
  5. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin told CNN, “I haven’t fully reviewed it.”
  6. Cynthia Lummis from Wyoming said she is waiting to read the legislation.
  7. Rand Paul of Kentucky said he hasn’t looked at it yet.
  8. Mitch McConnell from Kentucky was non-committal on Tuesday when asked if he would vote in support of the House bill that would enshrine same-sex marriage protections in federal law, saying, “I’m going to hold off announcing anything on that matter until we see what the majority leader wants on the floor.”
  9. Mitt Romney from Utah was noncommittal on the bill, telling CNN that the same-sex marriage law “isn’t something I’ve thought about at this stage” because “I don’t see the law changing.”
  10. Mike Rounds of South Dakota said he didn’t look at the bill. “I already think that the fact that we have eight to one in the Supreme Court indicating that it’s not going to make it probably a moot question to start with,” he said. When asked how he feels about same-sex marriage in general, he replied, “I think there is a difference between marriage as a sacrament and a legal marriage, so if anyone wants to enter into that kind of partnership, I’m not against it.”
  11. Rick Scott from Florida told CNN he wants to wait, but believes the Supreme Court has already decided this when asked if he would support the bill.
  12. Dan Sullivan from Alaska told CNN he needs to “review it.” He noted that he accepts the Supreme Court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage.
  13. John Thune from South Dakota, the GOP whip, told CNN he’ll “take a hard look at the bill” even though he’s previously opposed same-sex marriage. Thune said he expects the legislation to have as strong support from the GOP in the Senate as it does in the House. “As you saw there was pretty good bipartisan support in the House yesterday and I expect there will probably be the same as what you would see in the Senate,” he said. Thune also claimed the bill is an attempt to distract from economic problems and high inflation ahead of the midterm elections. Asked if his own views have changed, Thune declined to say explicitly. “I have a view on that, which goes back a long way. But I also respect the decision that the court made in 2015,” said Thune.
  14. Pat Toomey from Pennsylvania said he hadn’t looked at the bill yet when CNN asked him if he would vote for it.
  15. Tommy Tuberville from Alabama told CNN on Wednesday that he would like to wait and see the entire bill. “But I think people should have the freedom to do what they want. It’s a free country,” he said.
  16. Todd Young from Indiana said he didn’t read it. “The details are really important. Yes, so feel more comfortable answering that after I read the legislation,” he said, when asked how he would vote on the measure.

WAITING FOR AN ANSWER

  1. John Barrasso of Wyoming – CNN has contacted his office.
  2. Marsha Blackburn from Tennessee – CNN has contacted her office.
  3. John Boozman of Arkansas – CNN has contacted his office.
  4. Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia – CNN has contacted her office.
  5. Tom Cotton from Arkansas – CNN has contacted his office.
  6. Mike Crapo from Idaho – CNN has contacted his office.
  7. Kevin Cramer from North Dakota – CNN has contacted his office.
  8. Steve Daines of Montana – CNN has contacted his office.
  9. Deb Fischer of Nebraska – CNN has contacted her office.
  10. Chuck Grassley from Iowa- CNN has contacted his office.
  11. Bill Hagerty from Tennessee – CNN has contacted his office.
  12. John Hoeven of North Dakota – CNN has contacted his office.
  13. Cindy Hyde-Smith from Mississippi – CNN has contacted her office.
  14. John Kennedy of Louisiana – CNN has contacted his office.
  15. James Lankford from Oklahoma – CNN has contacted his office.
  16. Mike Lee from Utah – CNN has contacted his office.
  17. Roger Marshall from Kansas – CNN has contacted his office.
  18. Jerry Moran from Kansas – CNN contacted his office.
  19. Jim Risch of Idaho – CNN contacted his office.
  20. Ben Sasse of Nebraska – CNN contacted his office.
  21. Tim Scott from South Carolina — CNN contacted his office.
  22. Richard Shelby from Alabama – CNN contacted his office.

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