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General Motors uses AI to speed up the vehicle inspection process

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General Motors brings artificial intelligence to the vehicle inspection process.

The automaker is making an undisclosed “strategic investment” in Israeli startup UVeye, which makes vehicle diagnostic systems that use sensors and AI to quickly identify damaged parts or maintenance issues. The investment in UVeye was made by GM Ventures, the automaker’s venture capital fund, which also has investments in a several other AI themed startups

As part of the partnership, GM will sell UVeye’s technology to its dealer network to upgrade their vehicle inspection systems. (The company’s systems are already being trialled at a small number of GM dealerships nationwide.) GM will also partner with UVeye on a variety of vehicle inspection technology projects, including used car auctions, fleet operations and car dealership sales.

Based on images and videos provided by the company, UVeye’s technology resembles an airport body scanner for your car. The car drives through the scanner with lights lit inside and within minutes, service providers have a detailed report on everything wrong with your car right down to tire pressure.

UVeye’s system uses artificial intelligence, machine learning and high-definition cameras to “quickly and accurately” check tires and the underside and exterior of the vehicle for defects, missing parts and other safety-related issues.

GM says UVeye’s technology will be made available to 4,000 dealers nationwide. Earlier this year, the Israeli company signed a deal with a major automotive retail management system used by more than 15,000 dealers in the US.

GM is not alone in seeing potential in UVeye’s high-tech inspection system. Last year, the startup closed $60 million in series C financing from a group of investors led by CarMax, WR Berkley Corporation and FIT Ventures.

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