2.1 C
London
Tuesday, February 7, 2023

House passes bill to protect same-sex marriage and sends it to Biden’s office

Must read

Who is Wes Anderson’s wife, Juman Malouf? His married life, girlfriend and more

Wes Andersenthe director of movies, including Moonrise Kingdom, Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Grand Budapest Hoteland others is married to his wife Juman Maloufa...

RCap Resolution: NCLAT issues notices to Torrent Investments and others at the lender’s plea

The appeals court has ordered the petition to be listed on February 9, 2023 and says the appeal will be heard and decided by...

A single ticket in Washington State wins the $754.6 million jackpot

The lucky owner of a single Powerball ticket in Washington state has won a jackpot worth $754.6 million after matching all six numbers drawn...

WhatsApp allows users to post voice notes as status updates • londonbusinessblog.com

WhatsApp Status, the feature introduced in 2017 as the company's take on Snapchat Stories, has received a number of updates to make it more...
Shreya Christinahttps://londonbusinessblog.com
Shreya has been with londonbusinessblog.com for 3 years, writing copy for client websites, blog posts, EDMs and other mediums to engage readers and encourage action. By collaborating with clients, our SEO manager and the wider londonbusinessblog.com team, Shreya seeks to understand an audience before creating memorable, persuasive copy.

WASHINGTON — The House passed legislation Thursday enshrining federal protections for marriages of same-sex and interracial couples.

The vote of 258-169 sends the Respect for Marriage Act to President Joe Biden, who praised Congress for passing the bill and is expected to sign it into law. It comes after the Senate passed the same bill last week by a vote of 61 to 36.

Democrats voted unanimously in favor of the bill, while most Republicans in both chambers voted against it. Thirty-nine House Republicans supported the legislation on Thursday, with one voting present.

“Your love is your choice,” Steny Hoyer, D-Md., Majority Leader of the House, said on the floor Thursday, saying there is “no reason” to believe that Republican Supreme Court appointees won’t run again. want to look at precedents on LGBTQ rights after overturning Roe v. Wade. “The pursuit of happiness means you can love whomever you choose.”

“I’m shocked that conservatives with a libertarian bent believe we should somehow get involved in this,” he said. “It’s not the government’s business.”

Rebekah Monson, left, and Andrea Vigil, participate in a wedding ceremony at the Marriage Licensing Office in Miami, on Jan. 6, 2015.Wilfredo Lee / AP file

The legislation — led by Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., the first openly gay person elected to the Senate — would see the federal government recognize marriages that are validly consummated and guarantee full benefits “regardless of gender, race, ethnicity or national origin.” However, it would not require states to issue marriage licenses that violate state law.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi was on hand to knock down the vote and announce the passage of the bill. Loud applause erupted from the Democratic side of the room, with some Republicans applauding.

The bill was amended in response to Senate GOP demands. It clarified that religious organizations will not be forced to perform same-sex marriages and that the government will not be forced to protect polygamous marriages.

The bill’s revisions forced the House to vote again after passing an earlier version in July.

Former Representative Barney Frank, D-Mass., the first openly gay member of Congress, attended the vote at the Capitol.

“It’s a sign of massive political change in America,” he told NBC News. “And it makes sense to people. It is real. It is not a symbolic gesture. I know many married gays and lesbians who have been concerned since Clarence Thomas said what he said. So this is also reassuring for them.”

The legislation’s approval comes amid fears that the Supreme Court’s conservative majority would review same-sex marriage law after it repealed abortion rights. It reflects rapidly growing US public support for legal same-sex marriage, which reached a new high of 71% in June, according to Gallup tracks polls – up from 27% in 1996.

“Following the uncertainty caused by the Supreme Court’s Dobbs decision, Congress has restored a degree of security to millions of marriages and families,” Biden said in a statement. “They have also brought hope and dignity to millions of young people in this country who can grow up knowing that their government will recognize and respect the families they build.”

The president also thanked members of both parties who supported the bill, saying, “We have shown that it is possible for Democrats and Republicans to come together to protect our most fundamental rights.”

In the Senate, 12 Republicans voted with unanimous Democrats to pass the bill, which sent it back to the House. The GOP advocates formed an eclectic group, including retired Senator Rob Portman of Ohio, Roy Blunt of Missouri, and Richard Burr of North Carolina; centrist dealmakers like Senator Mitt Romney of Utah, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, and Thom Tillis of North Carolina; a leadership member in Iowa Senator Joni Ernst; and Conservative Senator Todd Young of Indiana, Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia, Dan Sullivan of Alaska, and Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming.

Fewer Republicans voted for the bill in the House on Thursday than supported the earlier version. Seven GOP members who voted yes in July opposed Thursday’s bill: Representatives Cliff Bentz of Oregon; Mario Diaz Balart, Brian Mast and Maria Salazar of Florida; Dan Meuser and Scott Perry, of Pennsylvania; and Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey. Another, Burgess Owens of Utah, voted “present” on Thursday after backing the bill in July. Two other Republicans — Representatives Mike Gallagher of Wisconsin and Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington — went the other way, supporting the bill on Thursday after voting against the earlier version.

Frank, who attended a signing ceremony with Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, reflected in an interview Thursday on the passing of the bill, 26 years after the Defense of Marriage Act banned federal recognition of same-sex marriage.

“I was here before the birth of DOMA. And this is a case where the funeral is a much happier event,” he said.

More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest article

Who is Wes Anderson’s wife, Juman Malouf? His married life, girlfriend and more

Wes Andersenthe director of movies, including Moonrise Kingdom, Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Grand Budapest Hoteland others is married to his wife Juman Maloufa...

RCap Resolution: NCLAT issues notices to Torrent Investments and others at the lender’s plea

The appeals court has ordered the petition to be listed on February 9, 2023 and says the appeal will be heard and decided by...

A single ticket in Washington State wins the $754.6 million jackpot

The lucky owner of a single Powerball ticket in Washington state has won a jackpot worth $754.6 million after matching all six numbers drawn...

WhatsApp allows users to post voice notes as status updates • londonbusinessblog.com

WhatsApp Status, the feature introduced in 2017 as the company's take on Snapchat Stories, has received a number of updates to make it more...

SoftBank loses nearly $6 billion in a quarter as recession continues • londonbusinessblog.com

SoftBank Group's investment vehicles posted a loss of nearly $6 billion in the quarter ended December as the Japanese tech investor continues to bleed...