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How to deal with disruptive people during meetings

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The question is, how do you deal with disruptive people without losing your cool – especially in an essential meeting? Here are some suggestions for staying in control.


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How to deal with people who cause disruption during meetings

When people talk and interrupt, it can be very irritating and irritating. However, if they interrupt you in the middle of a business meeting, or worse, interrupt you frequently, you need to do something. The question is, how do you deal with disruptive people without losing your cool? Here are some suggestions on how to keep control.

Establish ground rules.

Before the meeting, think of some ground rules that everyone can agree on. For example, start on time, even if someone is late. Likewise, let only one person speak at a time and do not deviate from the topic and your agenda. Constant interruptions, individuals talking at the same time, and colleagues chatting among themselves are all examples of disruptive behavior. Such behavior can be curbed by having a firm framework in the workplace. Plus, handing out a plan in advance can help guests think about their comments and questions more thoroughly.

Keep your cool.

You could get the impression of that particular person. They are on the planet for a purpose. Their sole purpose is to get under your skin, and you want to give them a piece of your mind. However, it is critical not to lose your cool or behave aggressively during this process. Instead, try to figure out what makes them disruptive or challenging to work with. For those who want to be more involved, you can give them the task of taking notes or keeping track of time. Alternatively, notice if they are always against you. You could invite the other Attendees to comment on their presented points to get a more balanced perspective.

Don’t get involved in a heated debate.

Having a heated debate in front of anyone is bad leadership – but having a debate with any degree of upset is not a good idea in your public company meetings – That is just as pointless as trading now on the Moscow Stock Exchange.

Having a heated argument with someone in front of the group is likely to make the rest of the group feel incredibly uncomfortable. You also run the risk of losing all credibility in the process. Try to maintain a positive attitude and avoid being dragged down by bad behavior.

There will always be cynics at meetings; all you have to do is talk as best you can to win them over.

Always treat each participant with courtesy. Every participant, however challenging they may be, should be treated with dignity and courtesy. Some people are disruptive without even realizing it – it’s just their nature – so accept that everyone is different and accept that they will be disruptive. Others in the conference may agree with their views, so never try to reject or mock them or their views.

Create an atmosphere conducive to learning.

For a meeting to be successful, it is essential to take into account the temperature and dynamics of the room. It’s possible that a room that’s too warm can cause a stir. Either everyone falls asleep in his or her chair. People will be more awake if the temperature is a bit on the cold side, which is perfect. Avoid placing dominant personalities close to each other as they can take over the meeting or cause a dispute among themselves.

Keep order during the meeting.

A competent meeting leader should keep the meeting on schedule without deviating too far from the goals of the plan. If someone becomes disruptive, you have the option to ask them to leave. For example, disruptions that negatively affect the flow of the meeting and prevent other people from contributing. However, this should only be done as a last resort in extreme cases.

Remote meeting

In a remote meeting, distractions are everywhere. And so are disruptions. And their devotees. Sports results are discussed before the meeting. Not during. The weather will be discussed afterwards. Not during. Politics is prohibited at all times. Before. During. And after that. Keep an eye on eye movements to see who is playing games on their phone. Or text.

Not every decision has to be made by consensus, especially if you are the manager or leader in charge of a project. one of a leader The main task is to get the perspectives of as many people as possible on the table. However, if you’re just looking for feedback, you need to be explicit.

Carl Bass, the former CEO of Autodesk, believes there is a built-in contradiction in encouraging individuals to express their thoughts, as it can lead them to assume that a choice would be made democratically.

This is how he immediately approaches it:

At the beginning of each meeting, he makes it very clear whether it is a decision of one person or whether it is more of a debate to come to an agreement.

He believes it is very important to understand, because otherwise people might get annoyed because they expressed their thoughts, but don’t understand the bigger picture behind the final choice.

Healthy discussions and ideas are important at certain times and people want to be heard. It’s worth saying that you really want to hear someone’s ideas or thoughts in detail and ask them to follow up and explain them to you so you can understand the full impact of the information. This comment and attitude will usually calm things down if you have remained friendly and neutral.

Featured Image Credits: Artem Podrez; Pexels; Thank you!

The mail How to deal with disruptive people during meetings appeared first on Calendar.

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