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Is using public Wi-Fi safe? Everything you need to know

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Consider the following scenario. It’s the weekend and you’re using the public Wi-Fi in your coffeehouse to close the gap on a few tasks you didn’t have time for all week. Does this ring a bell? It’s a familiar story to most of us; However, did you realize that as you balance your checking account and have a cup of coffee, you are oblivious to some of the dangers looming in the shadows of a public IP address?

What is free WiFi and how does it work?

Open Wi-Fi is available in many locations such as airports, cafes, malls, eateries and motels, and it makes it easy to find free internet. Individuals identify such “hotspots” before they think because they are common and familiar. While it may seem harmless to go ahead and visit your social networking accounts or check out a few news stories, everyday activities that require you to log in, such as checking your email or checking your savings account, can be dangerous over free Wi-Fi. .

Unfortunately, what can be observed over Wi-Fi is not limited to the search history.

Your Wi-Fi provider has access to much more information.

Consider the following scenario:

  • When did you first get on the internet?
  • Time invested on the internet
  • The amount of time invested on a specific website
  • URLs you viewed on a particular website
  • Data from HTTP websites that are not encrypted
  • Source and destination IPs

How to protect yourself when using Open Wi-Fi

do not:

  1. Turn on Wi-Fi to automatically connect to networks.
  2. Log in to another profile that contains sensitive data through an application. You can also go to the site and make sure it uses HTTPS when you login.
  3. If you don’t use WiFi or Bt, leave them on.
  4. Visit websites that have sensitive information about you, such as banking or medical profiles.
  5. Link to a connection that does not require a password.

Dos:

  1. Block file sharing if possible.
  2. Only go to websites that use HTTPS
  3. Log out when you are done with your work.
  4. Make sure your open Wi-Fi network is secure by using a VPN.

A VPN changes your IP address to appear as if you are connecting to the Internet from a different location: the physical location of the VPN server rather than your own. This is just one of the many reasons why VPNs are so popular.

Not only will a VPN setup your public IP address, but it will also improve your entire online experience. Using a VeePN service can help you get faster by bypassing throttling and avoiding network congestion.

What appear to be the potential dangers?

The problem with free Wi-Fi is that there are many security risks associated with it. While businesses may feel that they are fulfilling a vital function for their consumers, the protection provided by such systems is likely to be inadequate and non-existent. to attack

1. Man-in-the-middle attack

Any Man-in-the-Middle attack is one of the most common risks in these systems. A cyber attack is a form of espionage. Data is transferred from site A (machine) to the second point (auxiliary) when a device connects to the internet, and errors can let an intruder slip inside these transfers and “see” it. As a result, what you thought was personal is no longer private.

2. Networks that are not encrypted

The exchange of information from your laptop and mobile connection is encrypted, meaning it is sent in the form of an “encrypted message” that cannot be seen by anyone who may not have the decryption key. Confidentiality is disabled by default on most networks when they leave the manufacturer and should be enabled when the connection is established. So if an IT expert set up the system, chances are encryption is enabled. However, it is not possible to know for 100% whether this has happened.

3. The distribution of malware

There are several ways hackers can get malware onto your system without your knowledge due to software bugs. A computer vulnerability is a flaw or security vulnerability in a computer operating system or software. Attackers can take advantage from this error by building software to identify a particular error and then infecting your device with malware.

4. Sniff and sniff

What it looks like is wifi monitoring and sniffing. Malicious hackers can buy custom software packages and equipment to help them hack into Wi-Fi transmissions. This method can give hackers access to everything you do on the Internet, from reading entire pages you’ve visited (along with any data you may have entered while you were still on that site) to getting your login credentials or hijack your profiles.

5. Hotspots of Malice

Because the name looks believable, these “pirate points” mislead people into connecting to what they think is a real network. For example, you are on vacation at the Goodnight Inn and want to use the hotel’s wireless network. If you choose the “GoodNyte Inn”, you could assume that you… clicked on the right one, but you are not. Unfortunately, you have connected to a rogue WiFi uploaded by attackers, who now have access to your data.

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