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Spotify is quietly rolling out real-time lyrics on the Nest Hub

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Spotify has quietly rolled out support for real-time lyrics on the Google Nest Hub, according to a report of 9to5Google† Already made available on iOS, Android, game consoles, desktop computers and select smart TVs, the feature allows you to listen to music on Spotify while watching a stream of lyrics progressing with the song.

While Spotify has not formally announced the feature’s launch, a number from users – including the people at 9to5Google — report spotting real-time lyrics on their Nest Hub devices. As 9to5Google notes, you can access the feature by tapping the lyrics icon that appears in the lower-right corner of the screen when you select a song. The video below shows the feature in action.

It’s not entirely clear when Spotify rolled out the feature or where it will be available. The edge contacted Spotify with a request for comment, but did not immediately hear back.

At launch, Spotify only made real-time lyrics available to users in select countries in South America, Central America, and Asia. It expanded the feature worldwide last November, giving everyone the chance to sing karaoke or learn the lyrics to a new song. While the real-time lyrics are provided by music data company Musixmatch, Spotify previously partnered with Genius for its “Behind the Lyrics” feature, which TechCrunch reports has since been discontinued in favor of real-time lyrics.

The Amazon Echo Show and meta portal already have a similar karaoke-friendly feature that lets you display album art and real-time lyrics via Amazon Music. And while YouTube Music rolled out a lyrics feature to Android, iOS, and the web in 2020, the lyrics don’t advance with the song, meaning you’ll have to manually scroll through them while you’re listening. This feature doesn’t seem to have made its way to the Nest Hub yet.


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