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Steadybit wants developers involved in chaos engineering before production • londonbusinessblog.com

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Chaos engineering was originally developed at large companies to help them with pressure test systems in production. Over time, startups and open source projects have made it more accessible, but for the most part, it’s still in the domain of SREs (site reliability engineers) who test production systems.

Steadybit, a German startup wants to bring it into the reach of more developers by building these tests into its development pipeline. Today, the company announced the general availability of its chaos engineering product.

Benjamin Wilms, co-founder and CEO of Steadybit, says reducing chaos testing in the development pipeline will involve non-specialists so they can solve problems before going into production.

“Developers are haunted by incident after incident and under enormous pressure. We want to give them a more proactive approach earlier in the process where they can check and validate their code before it goes into production,” Wilms told londonbusinessblog.com.

He says they must be able to prove that the software can handle situations such as a cloud failure, rolling updates, or any number of incidents that could cause the software to fail.

Before joining Steadybit, Wilms was a consultant working with development teams to pressure-test their projects, and he found that by the time they got him in, it was too late because the software had been released. He saw an opportunity and launched the startup with his co-founders in 2019.

They built a solution to test the variable nature of today’s software development and let developers code the tests in the process, making it more automated to spot problems before they become a problem for users.

Steadybit test results screen

Image Credits: Steadybit

It’s still early days, but the company has five paying customers and eleven employees. As he builds the business, he says diversity is important and tries to learn from others who have built successful diverse organizations.

The startup has raised a total of $7.8 million in funding in three parts: a $200,000 pre-seed in 2019, followed by a $2.6 million seed in 2020 and another $5 million secondary seed last year.

Eliot Durbin, general partner at Boldstart Ventures, whose company led the seed round, was so impressed when he heard about the company that he flew to Germany the next day to meet the team in person, and agreed to check out that evening. to write. What made him so excited?

“Before Steadybit, ‘chaos’ tooling was designed first for SREs and operators, but not developers. What got me so excited (and on a plane to Germany the next day) was the founder’s keen focus on making it easy for product teams to test how their apps/services would perform, and share that responsibility with SREs and operators, Durbin told londonbusinessblog.com.

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