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Your boss doesn’t want to go back to the office either

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It’s no secret that when it comes to returning to the office, many employees resist or even quit — including those in charge.

According to a new Marcum-Hofstra Mid-Market CEO Survey, about 48% of CEOs are back in the office five days a week, while 32% are in the office three days a week or less. Ten percent of CEOs work remotely five full days a week.

“Whether it’s COVID concerns or the impact of inflation and gas prices, it seems clear that remote working, and especially a hybrid schedule, is the sweet spot for many CEOs and companies,” said KG Viswanathan, Interim Dean from the Zarb School of Business at Hofstra University, in a statement.

Related: 10 Leaders Who Set Examples of Good Work-Life Balance

The pandemic changed the way we think about work, and returning to pre-pandemic ways may not be so easy. While some companies are urging employees to return to the office in a desperate attempt to “get back to normal,” others are rethinking the concept of work altogether, prioritizing well-being over career advancement.

Andrew Formica, a 51-year-old chief executive at Jupiter Fund Management, announced he would retire from a $68 billion wealth management fund after three years of service and a lifelong career in finance.

“I just want to sit on the beach and do nothing,” he said told Bloomberg

And Formica is not alone. CNN reports that nearly 70% of the surveyed executives by Deloitte and Workplace Intelligence “seriously consider quitting for a job that better supports their well-being,” with 81% also saying improving their well-being is now more important than progress at work.

Related: It Could Be a Business Mistake to Go Back to the Office

Whether it’s a shift in priorities or the rising cost of living, “returning to normal” can be a concept that never happens.

“The specific reasons may change over time, but I believe this reflects a fundamental change in the way Americans view work in the broader context of their lives,” Viswanathan said.

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